New Olympic Sports

Betsy Bouton, Staff Editor

 

Coming up in the Tokyo Olympic Games in 2020, there will be five more sports added. These include baseball/softball, karate, skateboarding, sport climbing, and surfing. Baseball and softball has been absent for the last two Olympics, and fans are excited to see the sport make its way back into the Olympics. Also, organisers have proposed breakdancing to the IOC (International Olympic Committee) to be included in the 2024 Paris Games. The IOC has to make a decision on breakdancing by December 2020. I don’t know about you, but I’m excited to see if breakdancing makes the cut!

 

Tony Estanguet, the head of the IOC and three-time Olympic canoeing champion, said that the addition of new sports will make the Olympics “more urban” and “more artistic”. Breakdancing made its debut at the Youth Olympic Games in Buenos Aires in 2018. The medalists there came from Russia, France, Japan, South Korea, Canada, Italy, Austria, Vietnam, and Argentina. “Breaking has two elements,” Nakari Shigeyuki, a Japanese teen who won a bronze medal at the Youth event, told Olympic.org. “One is sports, and one is arts. We need the stamina of athletes, but we also need to be artists, and express our feelings.” 

 

Officials said that, among the five new sports, there would be 474 new athletes. 

In the breakdancing proposal, Paris 2024 organisers said that there will be both men’s and women’s events with 32 athletes in total. The competitions would be called “battles” and dancers would take turns dancing on the ground. The routines would be judged on details “such as technique, variety, performance, musicality, creativity, and personality.” Skateboarding will have a total of four events, and 96 athletes, split evenly among women and men. Sport climbing will also have four events with 36 women and 36 men. Surfing will have 24 athletes competing in each event. Paris 2024 said that breakdancing was an “obvious choice” as an addition because France has the second-highest number of participants right behind the United States.